CAS Week 2020


Renaissance College

Sham Shui Po (day 2)

Following the design of our ideas in Day 1, we moved onto finding materials for our products. In the morning of this bright and eventful Tuesday, we were informed to arrive in Kennedy Town to go on a tour of “Makerhive”.

We all made our way to the building individually, some on time, some late. Once we all arrived, a tour guide informed us that “Makerhive” is actually an office workspace for upcoming startup-companies and optimistic entrepreneurs. This “Makerhive” office is actually unique to others variants as it was created specifically for people who have interests in art, architecture and subjects similarly related to design.

The workspace enables people to experience an office environment and also allows the community to communicate and interact with each other. Members are required to purchase a monthly membership, there were multiple tiers and they determine the amount of credit (used for printing, booking rooms, snacks, etc) that you get.

In the centre of the office was a design workshop, it looked oddly similar to DT classrooms in school and even had many of the same equipment and machines. In midst of the tour, a man came in and he introduced himself as Phillipe (@fusedfootwear), he is a freelance shoe designer/maker who creates, prints and sells 3D printed shoes. He gave us a small talk on how his shoes were made and delivered some advice to some of us who wanted to pursue a career in design.

When the tour was finished, we headed out for lunch and agreed to meet up later in Sham Shui Po. Once we got there, Jeff (in-charge of the Shoe Artistry) led us on another tour, this time to find materials for our shoes. He introduced us to many shops which sold a variety of leather, laces, buttons and other materials. Many of the shops have been around for a long time and possessed a very traditional vibe. Inside the shops, we found leather of different colour, texture and made from the skins of various animals, including cows, pigs, crocodiles, snakes, etc. A few of us bought their own choice of leather as there wasn’t a wide variety of choices back at the shoe artistry.

Canaan Cheung



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