CAS Week 2020


Renaissance College

Day 3: Looking for Innocence

20/11/17 Authors: Jack, Brian, Lok Wa

“In life, there is no right or wrong answer.”

“So what?”

During our first days of teaching in Kathmandu, we learnt that there were no right or wrong answers. Today, it was not just the students at the school and the monastery that received a lesson. It was our group of twelve that received two lessons:

1. Nothing goes according to plan

“Give a man a fish, he will be full for a day. Teach a man how to fish, he will be full forever.”

The first day of teaching did not go as planned as our CAS week interfered with the monastery’s exam period. Thanks to our flexible time schedule, however, we managed to change our teaching schedules with the school by shifting between morning and afternoon.

The quote above was written on a wall in the monastery, and it gives a clear insight of our aim, our purpose of this trip.


Four days of teaching made it very unlikely that we can improve their academic performances within these days. However, it is possible to teach them how to approach to different questions/difficulties in their courses of academia.

Instead of teaching them solid materials, we can teach them how to learn and to think critically.

Of course, it is challenging for us, as current high school students, to teach them what we are not even completely sure of. But it is the attempt, our willingness and courage to try that is the point of this trip.

We had planned detailed lessons before coming over to Kathmandu to teach the kids. However, in consideration of the exams coming up for the monks in the monastery, our groups had to adapt and tutor the students in their exam instead. The music group even had to scrap their plans entirely, as the monks wanted serious help in their English skills! Although it was sad for us to see the plans we had worked so hard on to go to waste, we were ecstatic to help the students prepare for the exams and see their faces brimming in confidence with the skills we had helped revise.

2. The kids in both the monastery and school were extremely energetic.

They were eager to interact with us, and we were a bit blown back by their energy at first. However, they welcomed us with open arms and within moments it seemed that everybody had close bonds with the students.

It was just a day, but the experience with the students have certainly exceeded our expectations. We look forward to the next day of teaching and once again having lots of fun with the monks and students.


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